Info Showcase
TM
Roller Coasters - Why We Love To Be Scared Written by Phil White • Posted September 12, 2019 A Roller Coaster is one of our top scary entertainment choices that we have. But why do we love getting scared by riding them? The answer is simple, fun, with an element of safe danger. It’s the freedom to act wildly is one reason why so many people flock to amusement parks each year. Roller coasters are a major part of this attraction, and the people who run theme parks keep looking for new ways to make coasters taller, faster, and scarier. Coaster designers are always pushing the limits of insanity with their new coaster designs. While riding a wild and crazy roller coaster is a pretty safe way to be scared, let’s take a look at roller coaster safety. What does it take to make our modern day roller coasters safe for the masses of coaster enthusiasts? There’re unique safety systems implemented in all modern roller coasters. To help ensure rider safety, the “block system” has been implemented. Most large roller coasters have the ability to run two or more trains simultaneously, and the block system prevents these trains from colliding. In this system, the track is divided into a few sections, or blocks. Only one train at a time is permitted in each block. At the end of each block, there is a section of track where a train can be stopped if need be (either by preventing coaster dispatch from the station, applying brakes, or stopping a lift). Sensors at the end of each block detect when a train passes so that the computer running the roller coaster is aware of which blocks are currently occupied. When the computer detects a train about to travel into an occupied block, it uses whatever method is available to keep the train from entering that particular section. The trains are fully automated. What are the chances of getting injured or killed on a roller coaster? The amusement park industry states “that its rides are safe, estimating the chances of being injured at one in 24 million, and the chance of being killed at one in 750 million,” according to the International Association of Amusement Parks and Attractions. Will roller coasters put my heart in danger? For most young healthy folks there is almost no risk for heart attack and arrhythmias from riding roller coasters. But people with high blood pressure, a previous heart related issues, an implanted pacemaker or defibrillator, and others with a current heart disease, should not ride roller coasters, researchers have stated. Can you black out while riding a roller coaster? Neurologists have stated that passing out or blacking out on roller coasters can happen because the g- force of the ride can briefly deprive the brain of blood and all important oxygen. Some coater riders have experience what's known as "redouts," the experience of seeing red when blood rushes rapidly to the head. If you are healthy and willing, go out and have some scary safe fun riding your favorite roller coaster. One thing you need to keep in mind, nothing is a 100% safe. Always follow all posted safety rules and regulations. Oh, one more they, if you easily get motion sickness, you may want to consider some sort of anti-motion sickness medication, of course you should always consult with a health professional first.
Advertisement
Info Showcase
TM
Roller Coasters - Why We Love To Be Scared Written by Phil White • Posted September 12, 2019 A Roller Coaster is one of our top scary entertainment choices that we have. But why do we love getting scared by riding them? The answer is simple, fun, with an element of safe danger. It’s the freedom to act wildly is one reason why so many people flock to amusement parks each year. Roller coasters are a major part of this attraction, and the people who run theme parks keep looking for new ways to make coasters taller, faster, and scarier. Coaster designers are always pushing the limits of insanity with their new coaster designs. While riding a wild and crazy roller coaster is a pretty safe way to be scared, let’s take a look at roller coaster safety. What does it take to make our modern day roller coasters safe for the masses of coaster enthusiasts? There’re unique safety systems implemented in all modern roller coasters. To help ensure rider safety, the “block system” has been implemented. Most large roller coasters have the ability to run two or more trains simultaneously, and the block system prevents these trains from colliding. In this system, the track is divided into a few sections, or blocks. Only one train at a time is permitted in each block. At the end of each block, there is a section of track where a train can be stopped if need be (either by preventing coaster dispatch from the station, applying brakes, or stopping a lift). Sensors at the end of each block detect when a train passes so that the computer running the roller coaster is aware of which blocks are currently occupied. When the computer detects a train about to travel into an occupied block, it uses whatever method is available to keep the train from entering that particular section. The trains are fully automated. What are the chances of getting injured or killed on a roller coaster? The amusement park industry states “that its rides are safe, estimating the chances of being injured at one in 24 million, and the chance of being killed at one in 750 million,” according to the International Association of Amusement Parks and Attractions. Will roller coasters put my heart in danger? For most young healthy folks there is almost no risk for heart attack and arrhythmias from riding roller coasters. But people with high blood pressure, a previous heart related issues, an implanted pacemaker or defibrillator, and others with a current heart disease, should not ride roller coasters, researchers have stated. Can you black out while riding a roller coaster? Neurologists have stated that passing out or blacking out on roller coasters can happen because the g-force of the ride can briefly deprive the brain of blood and all important oxygen. Some coater riders have experience what's known as "redouts," the experience of seeing red when blood rushes rapidly to the head. If you are healthy and willing, go out and have some scary safe fun riding your favorite roller coaster. One thing you need to keep in mind, nothing is a 100% safe. Always follow all posted safety rules and regulations. Oh, one more they, if you easily get motion sickness, you may want to consider some sort of anti-motion sickness medication, of course you should always consult with a health professional first.

Advertisement